Helping You Protect Your Pet
from Preventable Disease

Vaccinations and Preventives

One of the reasons pets are living so much longer today is due to the efficacy of vaccinations that protect them from a wide range of common diseases. At examinations, we will review your pet’s health and lifestyle to cater a specific plan for your pet. We’ll also provide timely reminders for these medications, so your animal is protected with no lapses.

Pound Ridge Veterinary Center offers our current recommendations, effective January 2013.


Vaccinations for Kittens and Cats

All cats should receive the following vaccines:

  • Feline distemper (FVRCP)—Initial vaccination at six to eight weeks of age, then repeated every four weeks until 14 to 16 weeks of age. After the initial series, a vaccine booster is given at one year, and then every three years thereafter.
  • Rabies—This vaccine is first given when the kitten is at least 12 weeks of age. It is then given every year thereafter using a non-adjuvanted vaccine. This vaccine is required by law in New York State.

Depending upon the cat’s lifestyle, the following vaccine may also be recommended:

  • FeLV—Initially given as a series of two vaccinations a month apart, and then administered as a booster a year later. This vaccine is recommended for all cats. Subsequent annual boosters are recommended only for indoor cats that live with a feline leukemia positive housemate.

Vaccinations for Dogs and Puppies

All dogs should receive the following vaccinations:

  • Canine distemper (DA2P)—The first vaccine is done when the puppy is six to eight weeks old. It is then boosted every four weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks old. After the initial vaccination series, dogs are boosted a year later and re-vaccinated every three years.
  • Canine parvovirus (CPV)—The first vaccine is done when the puppy is six to eight weeks old. It is then boosted every four weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks old. After the initial vaccination series, dogs are boosted a year later and re-vaccinated every three years.
  • Rabies—This vaccine is first given when the puppy is at least 12 weeks of age. It is then given a year later, and every three years afterwards. This vaccine is required by law in New York State.

Depending upon the dog’s habits and lifestyle, these vaccines may be recommended:

  • Lyme—Initially given as a series of two vaccinations four weeks apart, and then administered annually. This vaccination is recommended for dogs living in areas of high tick exposure, such as rural areas, or who take frequent visits to parks and places with high grass.
  • Leptospirosis—Initially given as a series of two vaccinations four weeks apart, and then administered annually. This vaccination is recommended for dogs living in areas with a high risk of exposure to the leptospirosis bacteria, usually the same dogs who are recommended for the Lyme vaccination, although some kennels require this vaccine for boarding.
  • Bordetella—Given annually. This vaccine is recommended for dogs that engage in regular grooming and is required by kennels prior to boarding.

Vaccinations for Ferrets

All ferrets should have the following vaccines:

  • Canine distemper—Initially a series of two vaccinations given four weeks apart, and then administered annually.
  • Rabies—Initial vaccination is given at 12 weeks of age, and then administered annually.

Parasite Control

Kittens and puppies

  • Fecal parasite screen at the first visit
  • Worming at least twice during the first month of visits
  • Start on a regular preventive after the second worming (see below)

Cats

  • A fecal parasite screen annually
  • Treatment with Revolution each year, at least once per quarter for outdoor cats (monthly is preferred)
  • Minimally during warm weather, treat with Interceptor or Revolution every month

Dogs

  • A fecal parasite screen annually
  • Treatment with Sentinel or Heartgard every month, 12 months a year
  • Apply Vectra 3-D, Advantix, or ParaStar Plus regularly, every one to three months
  • In areas where ticks are a concern, our flea and tick collars may be preferred

Ferrets

  • A fecal parasite screen when first examined, and then annually

Heartworms

Dogs

  • Annual Accuplex4 test for heartworms and tick-borne diseases
  • Sentinel to control both internal parasites and fleas, 12 months a year

Cats

  • Optional preventive regimen with Revolution or Advantage Multi monthly throughout the year
  • Testing only if clinically indicated

Protect your pet from illness and call our Pound Ridge, New York, hospital today to review your pet’s schedule for routine vaccinations and preventives.